Desolation of Smaug trailer in 48 fps!

HobbitDesolationOfSmaugHFR48fps

UPDATE 7/20/13:  Here’s some background from Michael Sanders on his process for creating this trailer:

I used Adobe After Effects CS6. For each cut, I would try both AE’s built-in pixel motion and Re:Vision’s Twixtor plugin, and use whichever one had better results. For some pieces of the cuts where the warping and ghosting artifacts really got out of hand, I just used plain old frame blending which just layers the previous frame over the next frame. At 48fps, it goes by so quick you can generally get away with it in very short spurts. however, I plan on revisiting these cuts in particular with Twixtor using tracking points and/or foreground masks. And of course, the most important thing is you always have to separate out the first and last frame of a cut and leave it un-interpolated so you don’t get a real nasty “morph” between cuts. That’s probably one of the more time-consuming parts with really fast trailers with lots of cuts.

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Check out this excellent HFR (48 fps) interpolation of the Desolation of Smaug teaser, created by Michael Sanders:

Hey, I did an interpolation of the trailer for the Desolation of Smaug. Faster actions scenes proved somewhat problematic, but overall it turned out pretty interesting.  I may improve on it later.  The true frame rate is 48fps, but the actual video file is rendered in 60fps, since many players (including VLC) can have trouble with 48.

• http://files.futureleap.com/TheHobbitDesolationOfSmaug48fps.mp4

This 48 fps trailer is the first taste of new big budget high frame rate cinema since An Unexpected Journey.  And it’s been too long.  But I hope (and expect) that HFR / VFR content across all mediums will soon become commonplace.  If Desolation does as well at the box office as I expect–and if audience response to HFR continues to be positive–then there will be announcements that some big future films will be shooting in HFR.

And I have every reason to expect audiences will be even more impressed by the 48 fps in The Hobbit 2, given that Peter Jackson will have the chance to apply lessons learned from the first movie.